Lessons

Year 3 Kindlekrax

Camilla Garofalo has been reading Philip Ridley’s Kindlekrax with her year 3 class. In the previous lesson, she introduced a poem by John Agard, ‘The Hurt Boy’.

In this lesson Camilla introduces a ‘Double Bubble’ thinking map (David Hyerle)  to demonstrate how the characters in both texts can be compared. This graphic organiser helps the students formulate and record their ideas. In the second part of the lesson Camilla uses a ‘T diagram’ to illustrate the difference between literal facts (explicitly stated in a text), and ideas that are formulated from inferences (based on clues in the text).

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Year 5 The Iron Man

In this sequence Rachel Wilson reviews The Iron Man with a group of year 5 students.

To start the lesson, the students read a review of The Iron Man extracted from a broadsheet newspaper.  Rachel asks the students whether they agree or disagree with the review’s assertion that the story is a ‘modern fairy tale’. After sharing their initial thinking, Rachel then distributes a set of illustrations taken from well-known classic tales in allow the group an opportunity to relate new learning to prior knowledge. The students identify the characteristics of fairy tales, which are then listed on post-its. Finally, the students decide whether The Iron Man displays the characteristics that they have identified. Post-its are arranged on the table to form a visual record of their ideas (graphic organiser). After the lesson Rachel reflects with the group, and invites them to consider the next steps for their learning.

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Year 6 A Christmas Carol

In this sequence, Margo Rodrigo is working with a year 6 class.

Margo opens the lesson with an exploration of the word ‘greed’ after which she moves on to reading a new text using a ‘Think Aloud’ strategy. The students work through their ideas, making their thinking explicit as the text is revealed line by line. The technique is then applied to a visual text, which is connected to the first text. Having explored the way in which the texts are constructed and the meaning created, the students then apply their knowledge to the question, ‘what is the author’s purpose and intention in depicting the character in this way?’

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Year 6 Animal Farm

In this lesson Suzanne Maille is working on Animal Farm with her year 6 class. They have read a few chapters prior to this lesson.

To begin, Suzanne reviews what has already been read in order to prepare the students for new learning. Suzanne has prepared an activity to ascertain what thoughts the students have about the relationships between the different animals. In small groups, they are asked to sort a set of animal cards, using the form of organisation they think most appropriate. They work independently in groups for about 15 minutes. Suzanne visits the groups while they are working.

Please note for sound quality purposes, groups were asked to stop working so groups could be filmed giving the reasons for the method of organisation that they had chosen.

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Year 6 Beowulf

Scott Griffin works with a year 6 class.

In this sequence the students are exploring the themes that they have identified in Kevin Crossley-Holland’s retelling of Beowulf. They go on to compare the viewpoint of Hygelac, King of the Geats , with the view of the ‘speaker’ of Wilfred Owen’s poem ‘Dulce et Decorum Est.’

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